Fun In Seven

Fun In Seven

A bunch of nice drum chants in 7/4 popped into my head while I was hiking around Powerscourt Waterfall last week. So today I’ll show various applications for them, and talk about a basic force in syncopation: maximally even rhythms.

Here I’m singing one of my drum chants while improvising over “Like Someone In Love” (one repetition of the chant per bar of the original song). The chant uses the grouping 2 3 3 3 3.

Drum Chants In 7 - 2 3 3 3 3

What’s fun about this is that it really exposed weaknesses in my rhythmic conception. I noticed I was playing notes without knowing exactly where they were placed. Normally I would rely on my foot tapping to get back in time. But now that I was busy singing the drum chant, these vague notes made the whole thing collapse. To avoid this, I had to clearly imagine phrases before they were played, and also rely much more on my muscle memory to let my fingers solve the problems. Both of these techniques required a lot of relaxation and focus. I’ll be trying this again for sure.

Here I took the shape of the drum chant – its rhythm and use of a high and low tone – and turned it into a bassline consisting of two moving guide tones through the A sections of “What Is This Thing Called Love”. The grouping this time is 3 2 2.

Drum Chants In 7 - 3 2 2
In the B section of “What Is This Thing Called Love” I use a grouping of 3 2 2 2 3 2 (or 5 4 5) as a variation. I made that into a chant of its own.

Drum Chants In 7 - 5 4 5 2

Then I turned that into a bassline and used it for some slow metronome practice, in different placements.

Finally, I took the distinctive “short short short long” part of the previous rhythm…

Drum Chants In 7 - S S S L

… and arranged it three times across two bars of 7.

Drum Chants In 7 - Long

The long notes (the Ls) now mark out a large-scale grouping of 9 10 9. There’s an important similarity between the last few drum chants: they all split 7 beats into three “maximally even” parts.
With 7 beats, the maximally even grouping is 3 2 2 (or a mode of that such as 2 3 2).
With 14 beats (or 7 beats divided into 8th notes), the maximally even grouping is 5 4 5 (or a mode).
With 28 beats (or 7 beats divided into 16th notes, or 14 beats divided into 8th notes), the maximally even division is 9 10 9 (or a mode).

Maximally even divisions are crucial in syncopation: 12/8 clave, for instance, is a maximally even division of 12 notes into 5 parts (2 3 2 2 3). For that matter, the major scale itself is a maximally even division of 12 chromatic notes into 7 parts (2 2 1 2 2 2 1). The principle is that the “odd ones out”, e.g. the 1s in the major scale, should be spread as far as possible away from each other. So a 2 2 1 1 2 2 2 scale wouldn’t be maximally even because the 1s are beside each other. For an example of a maximally even rhythmic division in 4/4 swing, check out the vamps in my band’s version of I Remember You. Stream it here.

To develop my 9 10 9 drum chant, I smoothly subdivided the 9s and 10s to make a cymbal pattern (3 3 3) (3 4 3) (3 3 3).

Drum Chants In 7 - CYmbal

As you can hear, it sounds very much like a simple triplet pattern, with a barely noticeable skip:

 

Then I wanted to add a cowbell but realised it would need a three-armed drummer. So I turned the rhythm of the original chant into a blues scale bassline (much like the one I used for the metronome practice above), with drums playing a “long seven” kick pulse and the cymbal and bell parts.

Drum Chants In 7 - Re-Orchestrated

Here’s a video of me smiling smugly as I play all the parts:

Hope you enjoyed that. Let me know if you’ve any thoughts or if anything should’ve been presented differently. And merry Christmas to those of you celebrating it!

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