Striving For 3D

This week I made some progress towards towards coding 3D rendering!

I remember when I was in my early teens and a bit bored on holidays at my grandparents, trying to code an image of a road with 1-point perspective. I asked my grandfather to show me how to load the version of BASIC he had on his ancient Amstrad PC (it was GW-BASIC).

Back then, I didn’t get the basic idea of 3D perspective, but it isn’t actually very difficult: if objects are in a space in front of you where X is across, Y up and Z forward (and you are at 0, 0, 0), dividing their X and Y coordinates by the Z coordinate will create the necessary distortion.

(It seems that, typically, a small number is added to the Z component first to reduce the strength of the distortion, otherwise things get madly stretched off screen when the Z approaches zero. I bumped into that problem when making my Pink Sparks demo the other week.)

The real issue is that, to keep the code organised, manipulations of 3D data are best done using matrices. This way, a command can become data. Instead of running some code for each manipulation (such as rotating or resizing a shape), you have one piece of code that obeys a data representation of the desired command. This data is a transformation matrix.

You can then conveniently store these commands, for example the operations “Rotate by 30 degrees around the X axis, mirror in a plane with the same orientation as the X-Z plane but 5 units above it, resize to 80% scale” could be represented as three 3×3 matrices.

If you use homogenous coordinates, which are like ordinary coordinates but containing an extra element by which all the others are divided, then the Z-divide for perspective correction can be represented by a matrix which copies the Z value into that extra, dividing element (typically called W).

But enough of my attempts at understanding linear algebra! Let’s talk implementation details.

As usual, I made my demos in JavaScript. Being able to trivially publish stuff on the web, and send no-hassle links to friends or relatives, makes this the most attractive choice.

However, I decided not to use WebGL, the graphics-card-accelerated renderer that now comes with all browsers. I’ve been having a good time with WebGL tutorials, but connecting up buffers and typed arrays introduces more places to make a mistake and lose time debugging. I’ll return to WebGL someday because the raw power, the basic idea of shader language, and the depth-buffer and texture manipulation capabilities all attract me deeply. But for now there was, again, a clear best option: HTML5 Canvas.

This is a graphics API with higher-level features such as line-drawing commands – precisely what I wanted for my demos!

The first one I made demonstrated linear transformations in two dimensions. As you can see if you click here, these all operate around the origin (the centre point where the two axes meet), or to put it another way they preserve the origin. I used setInterval(..) to make the animation – not a good choice as we’ll see in a sec.

Then, I made a demo of affine transformations – a larger category which includes the linear transformations, as well as translations (i.e. just moving shapes around with no distortion) and mixtures of linear transforms and translations. To show the way that affine transformations can occur around any point, I added some quick interactivity to let the user set the centre point and choose a transformation. I also used matrix multiplication to iteratively apply the same transformation to my shape.

Affine transformations -area-preserving squash, in this case, which incidentally describes hyperbolic curves.

Around here I started thinking of possibilities for game graphics:

  • a stick person who squashes a bit before and after jumping
  • a stick person who leans back before and at the end of a run (wind-up and breaking), done with a shear transformation
  • explosions setting off shockwaves that pass through numerous characters on a the screen, squashing them in its direction as it does so
  • interactive objects that cause the player character to change size, Alice In Wonderland-style

(I was definitely channeling some old Flash games from my teens… stickdeath.com, anyone? I think that was the URL.)

I’ll get back to these ideas in a second to discuss what I think would actually be the hard part about making them…

My final demo was in actual 3D. Still working off Greg Tavarre’s nice WebGL tutorials (though NOT following his convention for ordering matrix elements in a 1D array), I implemented homogenous coordinates and a Z-divide. My first attempt had an annoying error in the Y-axis. Turned out everything was working, I had just put my transformation matrices in the wrong order so the up and down bobbing was happening after perspective had been applied!

That’s what it looks like! Click here to see it hosted on my site.

If you look at the working demo, you may see the star seemingly spinning the wrong way, despite the perspective cues, a classic illusion. I think this is just a general fault of wireframe graphics.

BTW The animation here is handled with the preferred modern JS technique requestAnimationFrame(..).

All this demo-making begs the question: could anything here become reusable software?

The matrix stuff is eminently reusable. To make it convenient, I would need to make an engine or interface allowing a programmer to load geometrical data, transform it and display it, through well-documented, user-friendly functions, while hiding inner workings.

So the last thing I did this week was some design work on a personal 3D library. Eventually this should be in WebGL, but to test the design I might do it in Canvas and maybe just with wireframes. The crucial point is that geometry exists in all these different spaces before it’s fully processed:

  • object space, that is, vertexes positioned relative to the centre of the object they represent
  • world space, so now that object is positioned in a world
  • camera space, now the world is spun around to face the camera
  • screen space, now anything visible is referred to by the position it takes up on the screen (in this case, the rectangular Canvas on a webpage)

All of these have potential for interesting experimentation. What exactly defines an object is an open question – can an object be composed of others, and in what ways might those sub-objects be transformed? Once in camera space, what are the possibilities for fish-eye effects or non-Euclidean geometry? And of course screen space is the traditional domain of the visual artist, the flat sheet.

Well that’s some big talk on the back of a spinning star. Baby steps though!

Author: drumchant

I'm a student software developer in Dublin, Ireland. Until November 2019 I was a full-time bass player. My old posts were about black music, plus some cultural and tech criticism; now I mostly write about programming. Thank you for visiting Drum Chant!

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