The Alternate Web

I want to bust a real quick one today on my recent experiences of dipping a toe into alternate and smaller-scale web platforms.

Of course, this article itself is hosted on a dominant web platform, WordPress. And I use Facebook daily for mundane purposes, mostly keeping up with people. (Twitter, on the other hand, gets no love from me.) I’m not writing to rag on big platforms, but to acknowledge a cultural moment when a lot of people are contemplating this switch.

I’ve been reading Hacker News (itself a big platform – they’re everywhere!) for a couple of years and quickly grew familiar with “bring back the old web” sentiments there. I would guess programmers, with their love of the esoteric and the stripped-down, have been saying such things forever. The argument, if I may sum it up crudely, is that personal webpages (whether self-hosted or on services like Geocities) and pre-Web-2.0 media like blogs, newsletters and forums, fostered a more diverse, friendly, expressive, open culture online.

Part of that nostalgia is people remembering a period when only nerds were online – no racist uncles or Karens, to reach for current stereotypes. Also, I’ve the impression that a lot of good memories come from participation in subcultures like MP3 blogs or Flash games, that would obviously have drawn together like-minded folks.

Fast forward to 2021, then, and it makes sense that the many current revivals of the old-school web favour nerdiness over mass appeal. I’ll discuss that a bit more below when I get to my actual experiences.

Another driver of interest in alternative platforms is the manifest inadequacies of Facebook, Twitter and so on. Those companies have the impossible task of trying to please everyone. High-profile bans and legal challenges show that the security, conflict-of-interest and privacy problems of ad-driven social media are out in the open these days.

That recently drove a lot of people from WhatsApp onto the competitor app Signal, including myself.

I also started my own personal website, kevinhiggins.dev, to have an online outlet where the form as well as the content are in my control.

Finally, and mostly inspired by one guy I follow called JP LeBreton, a mild-mannered, leftist game dev, I joined Mastodon, the platform I call “Twitter for nerds”.

I feel much freer to post on Mastodon than on FB, because I don’t have, nominally, 1000 people who know who I am and might be following my posts. The lack of an audience (I’ve no followers on it yet and only got a couple of transient likes) is okay by me. Same with Drum Chant, I never focused on driving traffic to here. This gets right to my perhaps idiosyncratic stance on web publishing of any kind: for me, “putting it out there” is more important than getting a reaction.

I know why this is, it’s a quirk in my personality whereby things feel much realer to me if I’ve written them down. (Hence this blog – and privately, I also journal and keep a half-dozen diaries and logs for various activities.)

Hmm. I’d thought this article might be an encouragement to others to try out alternate platforms, yet now I’m persuading myself that they’re for people like me who are mostly into organising an archive of their thoughts over hanging out with others.

That’s not to say I don’t want the hangs. My own motivation to try out these venues of expression was very simple: lockdown is very lonely and I’m hoping to meet new, like-minded people.

And there are some such on Mastodon, for sure. But rather than starting conversations, for now anyway, I’m taking the shy fellow’s tactic of crafting the feed I’d like to follow.

It’s been fun, and I especially like posting abrupt juxtapositions of content, e.g. counterpoint exercises one minute, rap lyrics the next. I feel free to perform a multipotentialite and intense persona there.

When it comes to my site I imposed more structure to present a neater picture for say a prospective employer. (Check out the site icon!) However, I chose a serif font and some moody colours specifically to hint at 90s web mischief. The links section is intended to send readers off into a maze of esoteric personal pages. Mixing business with pleasure.

I’ll wrap up today with a related trend I’ve noticed and then some blue-sky ideas for more alternate platforms I might try.

A lot of the writing that affected me most last year came by email newsletter. When I contacted the author of one of these to say hi, he mentioned in his answer that he’d found the supposedly old-fashioned format unprecedentedly effective.

I list the three newsletters I follow in the links page of my site.

And to finish… two more avenues for expressing myself online that I’ve been considering are Neocities and Project Gemini. The first is a user-friendly webpage-hosting and linking service, explicitly about recreating the old-school web. I think they might even have, whatchamacall those things, link rings? Webrings!

That could be a place to do something pseudonymous and weird. Prose poetry? Moodboards? Naughty fiction? Something warm and indulgent, anyhow.

(I already have one or two pseudonymous outlets, I recommend it. Though I’m ignorant of the whole web culture of “alts” built on the concept!)

Project Gemini is different. It’s a whole new web protocol, a communication format for online interchange like the Hypertext Transfer Protocol that underlies the whole web. So, instead of an address like https://kevinhiggins.dev, you’d have gemini://gemini.circumlunar.space/servers/

You need special software to view content using this protocol, and it’s text only. It took me more than an hour to find an app that worked, but when I did, it was weirdly fun to read people’s random posts by such a covert, strange route. I remember one person seemed to write only about guitar tunings they were exploring. That kind of thing.

If I publish in “geminispace”, I’d like to write about spirituality and wisdom literature, to lend my own brand of esotericism to the initiative. (Since the Christmas holidays I’ve been reading Chinese philosophy every day, and I’m also a big fan of the likes of M. Scott Peck… and I read a bit of Western philosophy too, until my brain gets tired.) That won’t be under a pseudonym and I’ll let you know here on Drum Chant if I get round to it!

Oh, last thing, I never said anything about Signal. Well, it’s very much like WhatsApp except I found the setup to be a bit more fiddly and tricky – getting stuck in loops asking for permissions on the phone, not immediately importing contacts. It also uses a spaced-repetition technique to get you to learn off your PIN, which is super-nerdy. (Though probably a good idea, I’m sure.) Nothing too surprising there.

Author: drumchant

I'm a student software developer in Dublin, Ireland. Until November 2019 I was a full-time bass player. My old posts were about black music, plus some cultural and tech criticism; now I mostly write about programming. Thank you for visiting Drum Chant!

2 thoughts on “The Alternate Web”

  1. I enjoyed this post! I think there’s a certain amount of idealism that attracts people to platforms like Mastodon, Gemini or Neocities, and it’s one I share. Plus, it can also be fun just to experiment with new things – that’s definitely been my motivation sometimes too.

    Liked by 1 person

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