The Tiniest Example

Here’s a learning technique I just discovered.

I was working on video rendering on Android devices – reading through and mashing together libraries and example code I found. The task as it’s currently structured has 6 main classes interacting:

  • An extractor to present encoded frames of video from a file
  • A decoder to decode each frame
  • An animator to keep this happening regularly and check if it’s time to show a new frame
  • A view which is the interface element the video will be shown in, and which I’m using as a convenient repository for all the other action (this seems to be pretty standard approach)
  • A renderer which talks to OpenGL, the rendering API

I’ve been bodging everything together in one prototyping/sketchpad project. My approach was to keep it just-about-functional for my one test case (displaying three overlaid alpha-blended video elements) as I swapped in and out components and ported bits from Java to Kotlin.

I definitely learnt a lot from that, but today I tried a different tack.

Instead of accomplishing a fairly complete task messily and crudely, I took the single component I wanted to understand and placed it in a blank, fresh project. Then I tested it!

A boring screenshot

I got the class, TimeAnimator, to report all salient variables to GUI elements. Like debug text but organised so I can see the situation at a glance.

I realised I couldn’t make it do what I thought it had been doing, which was fire events at a steady framerate equal to the video framerate (of 30fps).

I shuffled through variants of the class and learnt what they do.

After a bit, I realised none of them did what I wanted. I went back to the library I was studying and finally twigged that the controlling framerate/timing information came from the decoded video data, which was merely being checked (at a frequency much faster than the framerate) by the TimeAnimator, which is not meant to run anywhere near as slow as 30fps.

So far, so trivial. But I might have kept playing with the original code for ages without actually challenging my assumptions, distracted by all its moving parts and the fact that it looked somewhat like the final product I wanted.

I will definitely be reusing this technique of isolating the smallest component that I don’t understand, and “prickin’ it and frickin’ it” as my favourite rapper Guru might say.

Hope to be back here soon to discuss what this video functionality is actually for!